INSIDE LAKESIDE
Log In or Register

Check your spam/junk folder for activation e-mail after you register.

Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Go down

Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Talosian on Sat Apr 13, 2013 9:30 pm

There is a discussion on TOB about unlicensed attorneys. I'm confused.

Some seem to be saying some "attorneys" practicing law Lakeside are not licensed. If this is true, then how can they practice law?

I know there are no examinations per se to become an attorney, just schooling and I think an internship; there is no way an attorney can be "disbarred" and/or lose his/her license. I also am told, there is no such thing as a claim for legal malpractice in Mexico.

Confusing as hell.

The name Azucena Bateman came up, and I know her. Nice lady and her card says "Lic" which I believe means "attorney."

From what I have garnered in my association with attorneys Lakeside is that most of them really don't practice law; they are form-fillers.

Just random thoughts.



avatar
Talosian
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 235
Join date : 2013-02-07
Location : Chapala
Humor : All over the field.

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Jim W on Sat Apr 13, 2013 9:45 pm

WEIRD QUESTION, You must be new to Mexico......there are unlicensed in Mexico:

Attorneys
Doctors
contractors
computer repair techs
funeral parlors
bars
cat houses
dentists
restaurants

SLAINTE, help me out, I know there are more!! Is it possible....this is a John type question?
avatar
Jim W
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 5153
Join date : 2010-04-24
Age : 70
Location : Chapala
Humor : Whenever I need it!

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Talosian on Sat Apr 13, 2013 9:51 pm

Not new here, in fact I'm almost 9-years full-time.

I knew contractors, computer techs,but thought the others needed licenses or at least work permits.

Are licenses not needed or is it simply that they just pay some mordida and that's it?
avatar
Talosian
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 235
Join date : 2013-02-07
Location : Chapala
Humor : All over the field.

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Jim W on Sat Apr 13, 2013 9:57 pm

Talosian wrote:Not new here, in fact I'm almost 9-years full-time.

I knew contractors, computer techs,but thought the others needed licenses or at least work permits.

Are licenses not needed or is it simply that they just pay some mordida and that's it?


You crack me up.....9 years and don't get it! Licenses required.....do diligence...your responsibility to do background check! Snooze ya lose!
avatar
Jim W
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 5153
Join date : 2010-04-24
Age : 70
Location : Chapala
Humor : Whenever I need it!

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Talosian on Sat Apr 13, 2013 9:59 pm

Your point is well taken.

I just assumed - -- - - -
avatar
Talosian
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 235
Join date : 2013-02-07
Location : Chapala
Humor : All over the field.

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Jim W on Sat Apr 13, 2013 10:14 pm

[quote="Talosian"]Your point is well taken.

I just assumed - -- - - -[/quot]

I got so screwed by my contractor , who said he was licensed, back in 2006, cost me 75,000 pesos on a 300,000 pesos job, to correct all issues. He even had the nerve to try to get me kicked out of Mexico, due to his heritage. Just a simple suggestion, hire someone like Spencer, to check out anyone you plan to contract with.....even that is not a guarantee, however, a good start. Get references. Ask the reference if there was ever a problem....if he says no go to the next....beware of the 100% satisfied! When you find one that had an issue, and find out problem resolved immediately....You might have a winner.

Not trying to be a PITA, hope to help!
avatar
Jim W
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 5153
Join date : 2010-04-24
Age : 70
Location : Chapala
Humor : Whenever I need it!

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Talosian on Sat Apr 13, 2013 10:23 pm

Mexico, along with some other countries, is a poster-child for "Buyer Beware."

And BTW, I have learned that paying more doesn't get you near a guarantee of better quality or service here.

At least now, people can post negative experiences here and give names without fear of being charged with defamation.

A few years ago, people were afraid to say anything negative about a business but then the law(s) on defamation were made clear.
avatar
Talosian
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 235
Join date : 2013-02-07
Location : Chapala
Humor : All over the field.

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Intercasa on Sun Apr 14, 2013 12:07 am

So there are levels of sorts in the legal profession.

1) There are people who have finished law school
2) There are people who have finished law school and done their social service.
3) There are people who have finished law school, done their social service and who have paid all tuition owing and who have taken their sworn oath and applied for the state and / or federal attorney card.

#3 can practice law, #2 are referred to as pasantes and some can practice in a limited way, some people say they are attorneys but maybe haven't finished law school, never started, never did their social service or have unpaid bills from the university or are just too lazy to do the applications.

Where licenses come in for professionals or cedulas rather is when you interact with the government, only attorneys with cedulas can represent clients in court, only doctors with cedulas can write prescriptions, only engineers and architects with cedulas can have their plans and drawings approved by the municipal building department.
avatar
Intercasa
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 2790
Join date : 2010-04-05
Age : 47
Location : Chapala / Zapopan
Humor : Barbed wit

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by slainte39 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 1:08 am

Jim W wrote:WEIRD QUESTION, You must be new to Mexico......there are unlicensed in Mexico:

Attorneys
Doctors
contractors
computer repair techs
funeral parlors
bars
cat houses
dentists
restaurants

SLAINTE, help me out, I know there are more!! Is it possible....this is a John type question?

Unlicensed:
One that most foreigners come into contact with are, real estate brokers and their sales people.





Last edited by slainte39 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 1:21 am; edited 1 time in total

slainte39
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 7280
Join date : 2010-07-22

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by slainte39 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 1:10 am

Talosian wrote:Not new here, in fact I'm almost 9-years full-time.

I knew contractors, computer techs,but thought the others needed licenses or at least work permits.

Are licenses not needed or is it simply that they just pay some mordida and that's it?

Work permits are only required by foreigners, not Mexicans.

slainte39
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 7280
Join date : 2010-07-22

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by slainte39 on Sun Apr 14, 2013 1:38 am

Intercasa wrote:

Where licenses come in for professionals or cedulas rather is when you interact with the government, only attorneys with cedulas can represent clients in court, only doctors with cedulas can write prescriptions, only engineers and architects with cedulas can have their plans and drawings approved by the municipal building department.

And very important for anyone, foreigners and Mexicans, working or operating a business in Mexico, is contadores publicos (CP), with cedula to handle taxation matters with Hacienda, representing your RFC, especially if you are designated as "personas morales".
You are going to deal with Hacienda every month of every year, period.....
doctors, attorneys, architects/engineers, etc., hopefully not as often.

slainte39
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 7280
Join date : 2010-07-22

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Talosian on Sun Apr 14, 2013 6:29 am

Intercasa wrote:So there are levels of sorts in the legal profession.

1) There are people who have finished law school
2) There are people who have finished law school and done their social service.
3) There are people who have finished law school, done their social service and who have paid all tuition owing and who have taken their sworn oath and applied for the state and / or federal attorney card.

#3 can practice law, #2 are referred to as pasantes and some can practice in a limited way, some people say they are attorneys but maybe haven't finished law school, never started, never did their social service or have unpaid bills from the university or are just too lazy to do the applications.

Where licenses come in for professionals or cedulas rather is when you interact with the government, only attorneys with cedulas can represent clients in court, only doctors with cedulas can write prescriptions, only engineers and architects with cedulas can have their plans and drawings approved by the municipal building department.

Thanks. Nice to have someone who can/will answer a question directly and more importantly, has the right answer(s).
avatar
Talosian
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 235
Join date : 2013-02-07
Location : Chapala
Humor : All over the field.

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Trailrunner on Sun Apr 14, 2013 8:54 am

Intercasa wrote:So there are levels of sorts in the legal profession.

1) There are people who have finished law school
2) There are people who have finished law school and done their social service.
3) There are people who have finished law school, done their social service and who have paid all tuition owing and who have taken their sworn oath and applied for the state and / or federal attorney card.

#3 can practice law, #2 are referred to as pasantes and some can practice in a limited way, some people say they are attorneys but maybe haven't finished law school, never started, never did their social service or have unpaid bills from the university or are just too lazy to do the applications.

Where licenses come in for professionals or cedulas rather is when you interact with the government, only attorneys with cedulas can represent clients in court, only doctors with cedulas can write prescriptions, only engineers and architects with cedulas can have their plans and drawings approved by the municipal building department.


Really, Spencer, thanks so much for laying this out. Now it all makes sense. Very interesting too.

Sounds like this would be the same for the doctors practicing as well, si?
avatar
Trailrunner
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 5596
Join date : 2011-04-18

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Intercasa on Sun Apr 14, 2013 10:03 am

Sort of same for doctors, I am not one so can't speak from experience but know when filling prescriptions the pharmacies check the cedula of the doctor, no cedula, no medicine.

Also as a translator I have my credencial from the State Judicial council. That is needed for my translations to be accepted in the court system (I have approval in the 1st and 2nd judicial districts [Guadalajara / Zapopan and Chapala] . The court will check the judicial council list and if I am not on there they will reject the translation, also only peritos will have their translations accepted at the civil registry and other government offices such as immigration.

Translators who are not official will then have to pay another to put their stamp and seal which means more time and money for you or else having the translation rejected. They may NEVER represent you at a court hearing.

Here is a link to the official list of court experts [translators and all others] published in May, 2012, it is published every year as each year we need to submit a police background check as well as show we have taken continuing education and filled out the application forms as well as complied with filing our quarterly reports to the judicial council. http://cjj.gob.mx/noticia.php?noticia=21064
avatar
Intercasa
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 2790
Join date : 2010-04-05
Age : 47
Location : Chapala / Zapopan
Humor : Barbed wit

Back to top Go down

Re: Is there such a thing as an unlicensed Mexican attorney?

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum