INSIDE LAKESIDE
Log In or Register

Check your spam/junk folder for activation e-mail after you register.

Join the forum, it's quick and easy

INSIDE LAKESIDE
Log In or Register

Check your spam/junk folder for activation e-mail after you register.
INSIDE LAKESIDE
Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.

Newbie here

+20
Zedinmexico
lunateak
slainte39
Charliej
juanrey
Mainecoons
Big Daddy Mexico
SunFan
Trailrunner
ferret
GBATRUCKS
CanuckBob
otrocanuck
viajero
CheenaGringo
bobnliz
gringal
johninajijic
binky
Rella
24 posters

Page 1 of 3 1, 2, 3  Next

Go down

Newbie here Empty Newbie here

Post by Rella Thu Sep 06, 2012 5:31 pm

Hi....been reading here for a few months, contemplating where to go when I retire! Lakeside looks like such a nice place!! Been to BC but not to mainland Mexico. All seems like what I am looking for, but I am trying to justify to myself how could I go somewhere where I must either be in a gated community or behind walls. How did you come to choose to be here, when that is not how we tend to be NOB. (I am trying so hard not to use \/ 's since mine is broke on this keyboard LOL) Luckily, I got some time before retirement so I can do lots of research!

Rella
Newbie
Newbie

Posts : 5
Join date : 2012-07-05
Age : 66
Location : Chicago
Humor : definitely

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by binky Thu Sep 06, 2012 5:37 pm

Lots of us keep one foot in our home country and one here; it's the best of both worlds, I think. We retired young; downsized in US, bought in the village here. Life is good.
binky
binky
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 260
Join date : 2012-05-23

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by johninajijic Thu Sep 06, 2012 5:45 pm

Rella wrote: Hi....been reading here for a few months, contemplating where to go when I retire! Lakeside looks like such a nice place!! Been to BC but not to mainland Mexico. All seems like what I am looking for, but I am trying to justify to myself how could I go somewhere where I must either be in a gated community or behind walls. How did you come to choose to be here, when that is not how we tend to be NOB. (I am trying so hard not to use \/ 's since mine is broke on this keyboard LOL) Luckily, I got some time before retirement so I can do lots of research!

If you have enough money you can keep two homes, but do you really want year round expenses and responsibilities of two homes. Don't cut yourself short.

We came here 11 years ago to visit friends who had already lived here for 4 years. One is an Architect and one was a Realtor, so we looked at houses for 1 1/2 weeks and found where we wanted to live. We signed a contract with a reputable builder to build our new home, sold our house in Pembroke Massachusetts to the 2nd couple that walked in the door. We packed up after Christmas and were here in March 2001. Never looked back.

We chose a new development gated community called "Los Arroyos Sur" with beautiful lake and mountain views. Our side walls are only 7 feet high for privacy.

We moved here because of the year round temperate climate and cost of living. New England was pretty cold and snowy in the winter.
johninajijic
johninajijic
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 3850
Join date : 2010-10-23
Age : 78
Location : West Ajijic
Humor : Sometimes

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by gringal Thu Sep 06, 2012 5:52 pm

As one who moved here eight years ago and never went back.....this is coming from a different perspective than Binky's.

Like many Latin and European countries, the walled homes are for privacy as well as security. It doesn't take long to learn to love a walled garden, and as a downtown Ajijic Village resident, I'm used to seeing barred windows. Some are works of art. Perhaps as a result of same, we've never had a robbery. (Crossed fingers, of course). Personally, I wouldn't want to live in a gated community, and with some exceptions, it's no more secure there, either.

As for relatives and friends.......we have a pleasant private bed and bath for them when they visit. After all, we've seen the States, so they find visiting Mexico a bigger treat.

Much of how we feel about living in a foreign country depends on our experiences, attachment to ways we are accustomed to, and our personal adaptability to change.

It is usually a good idea to keep your place in the States and come here to rent for at least six months before making a commitment to move permanently.

gringal
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 11882
Join date : 2010-04-09
Location : Lake Chapala (from CA)
Humor : occasionally

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by bobnliz Thu Sep 06, 2012 6:33 pm

Hi, Rella, G-gal has given you excellent advice, well worth listening to.
I would like to say however, that México is a big country and you might consider trying out a variety of places before you settle on a final location.

What Binky says is also very true. Some folks prefer to be snowbirds, at least for a while... then with some experience under their belts, they may decide to become full timers.
Bob and I are snowbirding it for now... home in Colorado during the summer, San Carlos in the winter.

IMHO, we goes through life finding out what we don't want... and experience is the best teacher. Lizzy
bobnliz
bobnliz
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 1662
Join date : 2010-04-05
Location : Colorado/Mexico
Humor : wry ans dry

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by CheenaGringo Thu Sep 06, 2012 6:42 pm

Rella:

While I have always held a negative view of living behind walls, there are numerous variables to be found in that department. A friend of ours rents what I would term a rather nice hacienda and we have stayed there any number of times. I have never felt claustrophobic behind his walls because of the space:
https://picasaweb.google.com/118146709599975173363/FRIENDSHACIENDARIBERASJALISCO?authkey=Gv1sRgCNrnya60wuq5rQE#slideshow/5649628238861599778

As for gated or walled communities, my impression is that they are similar to some similar developments found NOB. Along with them come HOA's and the inherent politics and cliques.

As Lizzy pointed out, there are numerous other options scattered all over Mexico.

CheenaGringo
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 6692
Join date : 2010-04-17

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by viajero Thu Sep 06, 2012 6:58 pm

Do you know how much the rent is Neil?

viajero
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 5755
Join date : 2011-07-26
Location : San Pedro de los Saguaros
Humor : Twain

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty dont worry be happy

Post by otrocanuck Thu Sep 06, 2012 7:02 pm

You have to realize that gated communities are everywhere in Mexico and Central America, it is what is expected by gringos to be there. Most foreigners when they move to any other country they feel insecure at first until they become familiar and comfortable in their new surroundings. If there was not a demand by North Americans they would not build them here. When a local builder is catering to the North American client then one of the necessary services that goes into the planning of the new community or subdivision is the fencing and security. It just would not be a community without the gated part here in this country.

Look at it this way - in this country you may have to protect your belongings from theft and your windows with bars, but you can still safely attend movie openings, political celebrations, places of worship, and tourist attractions like the Empire State Building without fear of being shot by a looney.
otrocanuck
otrocanuck
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 201
Join date : 2012-07-12
Age : 67
Location : Mississauga, Point Claire, Edmonton, Saltspring Isl., Nakusp,Chapala,

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by CanuckBob Thu Sep 06, 2012 7:07 pm

There are gated communities all over Guadalajara and throughout Mexico. It doesn't have anything to do with "gringos", it has to do with the haves vs the have nots.
CanuckBob
CanuckBob
Humble Administrator
Humble Administrator

Posts : 19814
Join date : 2010-04-04
Age : 59
Location : Lake Chapala (from Vancouver)
Humor : Sick and twisted

https://casadecomo.mx

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by otrocanuck Thu Sep 06, 2012 7:24 pm

Your right Bob I stand corrected I should have used the term "privileged" instead of "gringo". I guess I just have become use to seeing the gringos as always being privileged and am now interchanging the terms. Generalizing again.

Nice to see you on the forum again Bob, almost like you are back here.
otrocanuck
otrocanuck
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 201
Join date : 2012-07-12
Age : 67
Location : Mississauga, Point Claire, Edmonton, Saltspring Isl., Nakusp,Chapala,

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by CanuckBob Thu Sep 06, 2012 7:50 pm

Jajaja.....no problem OC. I understand the correlation. I just didn't want the OP to get the wrong impression. Secured (Gated) communities are prevalent in any country where the disparity between the poor and rich is large and there are few social safety nets. Unfortunately, Mexico is certainly not the only country in that category.........
CanuckBob
CanuckBob
Humble Administrator
Humble Administrator

Posts : 19814
Join date : 2010-04-04
Age : 59
Location : Lake Chapala (from Vancouver)
Humor : Sick and twisted

https://casadecomo.mx

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by GBATRUCKS Thu Sep 06, 2012 9:07 pm

CanuckBob wrote:There are gated communities all over Guadalajara and throughout Mexico. It doesn't have anything to do with "gringos", it has to do with the haves vs the have nots.

C-Bob, In all due respect, "BOLLOCKS!" It is a matter of what kind of life style you want. Some come here wanting to drag their northern culture with them, to feel secure and comfortable surrounded by like-minded folks. Others of us are trying to escape from that consumer based shallow group-think mentality, and WANT to immerse into the Mexican culture. There are many of us who CHOOSE to live away from the "Gringo Gulch" of the Ajijic area even though, believe it or not, we actually could afford to live in the gated communities. We live in a Mexican neighborhood in Jocotepec, and would rather have multiple root canals then live behind the gates. PS: Hurry back..We miss your smiling face. Very Happy
GBATRUCKS
GBATRUCKS
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 626
Join date : 2011-04-19
Location : Jocotepec
Humor : Black Adder sarcasm

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by ferret Thu Sep 06, 2012 9:51 pm

Up until moving here to Ajijic 15 months ago, we never lived in a "gated" community in Mexico...9 years in San Miguel de Allende and 6 years in San Pancho, Nayarit. I could care less one way or the other. It just so happens that we chose homes to rent in two gated communities here...because we liked the houses and we liked the locations...nothing more, nothing less.
Do I like the rules such as noise control, pet control, access control etc. etc. YES! But those things were not sought out specifically...they just happen to be enjoyed almost as afterthoughts.
Each to his/her own.
ferret
ferret
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 9433
Join date : 2010-05-23

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by bobnliz Thu Sep 06, 2012 10:25 pm

I never thought we would live in a gated community... but here we are. Turned out we wanted a heated pool, hot tub, laundry, library, etc...
We didn't want to maintain these things ourselves, or deal with hiring and firing.
We studied the rules and regs and we bought for what they had, not for what they didn't.

I worked the Renaissance Festivals for 20 years... definitely a gated community.... rules everywhere, for construction and materials... for dress and dialect, (speak the Queen's English and no anachronisms allowed)
There are rules for what you can sell and what you cannot ... rules for guests, rules for pets, don't forget security, oh yeah... parking passes... water, electricity... and god forbid the King should step in some doggy's duty.
More rules than the HOA, by a long shot.

Best of all... it's all in the contract. Newbie here 169387 Lizzy
bobnliz
bobnliz
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 1662
Join date : 2010-04-05
Location : Colorado/Mexico
Humor : wry ans dry

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by johninajijic Thu Sep 06, 2012 10:48 pm

CanuckBob wrote:There are gated communities all over Guadalajara and throughout Mexico. It doesn't have anything to do with "gringos", it has to do with the haves vs the have nots.

I disagre. My insurance agent lives in a coto (gated community) in GDL. He is not priveleged or rich. He has a 3 BRm 2.5 BA home that he paid approx $ 130 K for 4 years ago.

And NOB in many cities they have large groups of homes with clubhouses, swimming pools etc and no gates. These have low HOA fees.
johninajijic
johninajijic
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 3850
Join date : 2010-10-23
Age : 78
Location : West Ajijic
Humor : Sometimes

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by CanuckBob Thu Sep 06, 2012 11:02 pm

If your insurance agent could afford a 130K house then he would be considered rich (or well off) by a majority of the Mexican populace.........

The point of the matter, if you choose to read my original answer, is that "gated communities" while primarily occupied by gringos around the lake, have nothing to do with "gringo" influence. The rich (and those that can afford it) Mexicans live in them as well as over Mexico.
CanuckBob
CanuckBob
Humble Administrator
Humble Administrator

Posts : 19814
Join date : 2010-04-04
Age : 59
Location : Lake Chapala (from Vancouver)
Humor : Sick and twisted

https://casadecomo.mx

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by johninajijic Thu Sep 06, 2012 11:15 pm

CanuckBob wrote:If your insurance agent could afford a 130K house then he would be considered rich (or well off) by a majority of the Mexican populace.........

The point of the matter, if you choose to read my original answer, is that "gated communities" while primarily occupied by gringos around the lake, have nothing to do with "gringo" influence. The rich (and those that can afford it) Mexicans live in them as well as over Mexico.

Sorry. I misunderstood your post. Let me say this, he's not rich to afford a $ 130 K house, that's middle class in Mexico.

There are far more "Middle class" Mexicans in Ajijic than people realize and far more "Middle to upper class" Mexicans in GDL. Ever see those well dressed women buying stuff in Liverpook with credit cards and wow, I wished I could afford their cars.
johninajijic
johninajijic
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 3850
Join date : 2010-10-23
Age : 78
Location : West Ajijic
Humor : Sometimes

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by Rella Fri Sep 07, 2012 5:48 pm

Thank you all for the great responses!! Walls and bars really don't bother me, I think I could get used to them. I plan on renting til I find a place the suits me for the long haul. No interest in being a snow bird either....had enough snow to last me a lifetime!!!

I am looking for some place that will fulfill my needs for a big change in my life...but still be able to get some of the things I am accustomed to here in the states....like certain foods that I see you are able to get there.

Good thing I got lots of time and can learn much more about Mexico!!

Rella
Newbie
Newbie

Posts : 5
Join date : 2012-07-05
Age : 66
Location : Chicago
Humor : definitely

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by Trailrunner Fri Sep 07, 2012 6:09 pm

Good attitude, Rella, you'll do well here.

Yep, rent for at least a year, learn Spanish (learn Spanish/learn Spanish), observe the culture and follow along to the extent which you are comfortable, know that you'll be a rookie for at least 3 years (some people never get a clue), don't easily trust anyone (make them earn it), know that things are unbelievably not as they seem (esp when viewing through NOB filters), travel the country and learn about it 's history and peoples (and converse with them in their language), know that the first year you will hemorrhage money (but it'll get better after that), smile a lot (that's the easy part) and enjoy your new life!
Trailrunner
Trailrunner
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 7998
Join date : 2011-04-18

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by SunFan Fri Sep 07, 2012 6:26 pm

Come on down! Visit. Anytime of the year.

I was chatting with a resident at the American Legion Luau get-together a couple of weeks ago. He'd lived on most of the Hawaiian Islands for 35 years. Said the weather here was far superior.

You'll love it!

SunFan
SunFan
SunFan
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 1234
Join date : 2011-09-11
Age : 75
Location : San Antonio Tlayacapan - Upper Chula Vista
Humor : None....no I'm joking.

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by otrocanuck Fri Sep 07, 2012 7:26 pm

Trailrunner - loved your post and advice. We are newbies also here in our first year and so far only the learning Spanish part seems to be coming slowly for us. We are using all the tapes and cd's out there and language books and have picked up a bit but the going is slow and uphill. Any advise here on what worked best for you to learn the language?
otrocanuck
otrocanuck
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 201
Join date : 2012-07-12
Age : 67
Location : Mississauga, Point Claire, Edmonton, Saltspring Isl., Nakusp,Chapala,

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by Big Daddy Mexico Fri Sep 07, 2012 7:32 pm

otrocanuck wrote:Trailrunner - loved your post and advice. We are newbies also here in our first year and so far only the learning Spanish part seems to be coming slowly for us. We are using all the tapes and cd's out there and language books and have picked up a bit but the going is slow and uphill. Any advise here on what worked best for you to learn the language?

I have been here 4 years. Married a Beautiful Mexican Lady and taught her English. Took several Spanish classes over the years and not until I took the Warren Hardy course, did it finally click for me. It is a great course. Try it first before you waist your time and money on other stuff.

Big Daddy mariachi

As a side note, while practicing with my wife, it also helped her to learn English.
Big Daddy Mexico
Big Daddy Mexico
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 329
Join date : 2012-04-20
Location : www.BigDaddysSausages.com

http://www.bigdaddyssausages.com

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Big Daddy

Post by otrocanuck Fri Sep 07, 2012 7:52 pm

Big Daddy - I got the first workbook of the Warren Hardy series and it reminded me too much like those days back in university, studying until my brain hurt. It was not an enjoyable exercise to do daily for me. The idea of sitting back and listening to a tape appeals to me far more then pounding the books. But I like your suggestion of having a beautiful Mexican lady to help in learning the language. I will try to convince my wife that is the way to go!!!!

Shit stirring
otrocanuck
otrocanuck
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 201
Join date : 2012-07-12
Age : 67
Location : Mississauga, Point Claire, Edmonton, Saltspring Isl., Nakusp,Chapala,

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by Big Daddy Mexico Fri Sep 07, 2012 8:02 pm

otrocanuck wrote:Big Daddy - I got the first workbook of the Warren Hardy series and it reminded me too much like those days back in university, studying until my brain hurt. It was not an enjoyable exercise to do daily for me. The idea of sitting back and listening to a tape appeals to me far more then pounding the books. But I like your suggestion of having a beautiful Mexican lady to help in learning the language. I will try to convince my wife that is the way to go!!!!

Shit stirring

I have the cd for the book also if you want it. I took the course twice a week for 2 hours. And then studied with the wifey. Worked great for me. I also scored the cheat notes and a few other things that helped. We got some friends taking another type of Spanish class and they are finding it difficult. And most definitely studying with a beautiful Mexican Lady makes it soooooo much easier. LOL
Surte
Big Daddy Mexico
Big Daddy Mexico
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 329
Join date : 2012-04-20
Location : www.BigDaddysSausages.com

http://www.bigdaddyssausages.com

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by bobnliz Fri Sep 07, 2012 8:07 pm

Rella wrote:Thank you all for the great responses!! Walls and bars really don't bother me, I think I could get used to them. I plan on renting til I find a place the suits me for the long haul. No interest in being a snow bird either....had enough snow to last me a lifetime!!!

I am looking for some place that will fulfill my needs for a big change in my life...but still be able to get some of the things I am accustomed to here in the states....like certain foods that I see you are able to get there.

Good thing I got lots of time and can learn much more about Mexico!!

Rella... We too are over shoveling snow. That's how come we're snowbirds... we go south in the winter. Newbie here 169387 Lizzy
bobnliz
bobnliz
Share Holder
Share Holder

Posts : 1662
Join date : 2010-04-05
Location : Colorado/Mexico
Humor : wry ans dry

Back to top Go down

Newbie here Empty Re: Newbie here

Post by Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Page 1 of 3 1, 2, 3  Next

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum